Posts Tagged washington university

Cyber Cold War?

Next month, I’m excited to be giving a public lecture sponsored by The Tuesday Women’s Association (TWA) and the American Association of University Women (AAUW).  It is part of their 2012 International Relations Lecture Series and is entitled Cyberspace: A New Cold War Front. It will be held on January 10, 2012 at 10:45am at the Ethical Society building on 9001 Clayton Rd., St. Louis, MO 63117.

I’m really looking forward to it. I’m used to lecturing at Washington University, and giving industry tutorials, and making business and standards body presentations, but a public lecture like this is is something different!

And this is a really interesting topic, too. I’ll be talking about Stuxnet, and other industrial cyber espionage. I’ll get to talk about the attacks on Google originating from China. I’ll talk about hacking as a weapon in various conflicts between Russia and former Soviet republics.

Of course, I’ll try to educate about computer and Internet security, drawing some examples from my techno thriller cyber crime mystery Counting from Zero.  While it is mainly about cyber crime for profit, the techniques and attacks are similar.

If you are in St Louis, it would be great to see you there. If not, maybe I’ll post a recording or at least my slides on this blog.

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The Lecturing Life

Since I love teaching and lecturing, I think it is fitting that the first review of my novel Counting from Zero should come from the Science Editor at Washington University where I teach. My favorite part of the review is this quote:

Counting from Zero brings Dashiell Hammet and Raymond Chandler into the computer age.”

My first experience of teaching was as a grad student at Lehigh University. I was a teaching assistant or TA throughout the four years I worked on my PhD. I didn’t actually teach classes, but I ran tutorials and labs. I enjoyed it a lot and found I was kind of good at it. I used to enjoy the student reviews at the end of each semester. My favorite comment from one student was: “Alan is a chill guy.”

Later in my career, I got involved with Voice over IP or VoIP and Session Initiation Protocol or SIP. As this was a new technology, I needed to help train other engineers at my company. I started running sessions for 25, 50, and even 100 engineers at a time, teaching SIP. My books on SIP came out of this experience.

About this same time, I contacted Washington University in St. Louis and asked if they wanted to hear the latest about SIP and VoIP. I met Professor Paul Min who was in charge of running seminars for the Electrical Engineering Department. Soon, I gave the seminar and started meeting the staff. I did some teaching for other professors when they were out of town. Next thing I knew, they asked if I wanted to teach an evening class the next fall. I said yes!

That was 10 years ago. I have taught a variety of classes but found my home in the Joint Engineering Program with UMSL, the University of Missouri St. Louis. I particularly enjoy teaching in this program because most students have jobs and practical experience. One highlight was developing and teaching a class in Internet Communications. My text book: one of my SIP books!

My teaching style is fairly traditional – I like writing on the blackboard. I’ve also experimented with newer technologies such as Google Wave. My least favorite part is marking HW and assigning grades.

I’m currently not teaching this semester due to my travel load but I can’t wait to be back in the Fall. I miss the energy and enthusiasm of students.

So thank you to Washington University and UMSL, my colleagues and students.  Perhaps one day I can teach an Internet security class and use Counting from Zero as the textbook – that would be fun!

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