Posts Tagged W3C

Following WebRTC

WebRTC, Web Real-Time Communications, is a fast moving topic these days!  Here are a few of my suggestions for how to keep up.

First a note about terminology.  Although Google named their open source project webrtc, WebRTC is not just a Google project, it is a major industry initiative involving open Internet standards being developed by many participants.  Don’t confuse these two!

1. Follow Browser Announcements and Releases

Google and Mozilla are the browsers most actively implementing WebRTC today.  WebRTC is available in Google Chrome Beta browser. Download and give it a try for the latest WebRTC extensions.  Some future WebRTC capabilities may be in Google’s Chrome Canary which is the developers preview version of the browser.  To experiment with Mozilla Firefox, you will need to use their nightly build.  Microsoft Internet Explorer and Apple Safari don’t yet have anything available, but you can track their future announcements here and here.

2. Follow the Standards

WebRTC is not just about browser deployments, it is about standard APIs and standard protocols.  To really follow what is going on in WebRTC, you need to track the standards being developed in the W3C and IETF.  This can be a bit tricky, but if you start with the W3C WEBRTC Working Group and the IETF RTCWEB Working Group, that is a good start.

If you have an eReader, try this out.  Here is a link to download the entire set of RTCWEB IETF Internet-Drafts in EPUB format  and here is the set in MOBI format.    Various other sets of IETF documents and RFCs is also available at http://tools.ietf.org/ebook/.  The conversion is done using a script written by Tero Kivinen – nice  job!  The formatting of the ASCII art is not 100%, but this is a difficult problem.  The MOBI format worked better for me than the EPUB version, but YMMV.  Perhaps one day the IETF will adopt a friendlier format for Internet-Drafts and RFCs, but I’m not holding my breath!

3. Try WebRTC sites and applications

There are a number of sites and applications already taking advantage of WebRTC features.  One of my favorites is FrisB, a cool new way to think about browser to PSTN communication.  You can find plenty of others by searching the web.  Also, many developers announce and discuss their WebRTC projects on Twitter, so searching with the #webrtc hashtag can find lots of cool things.

There are some interesting blogs out there on WebRTC, including a blog by Tsahi Levent-Levi.

WebRTC: APIs and RTCWEB Protocols of the HTML5 Real-Time Web Book CoverFor background on WebRTC, there are some decent resources.  You might enjoy this video presentation by one of the editors of the W3C WebRTC specification, Cullen Jennings.  If you like books, you might like “WebRTC: APIs and RTCWEB Protocols of the HTML5 Real-Time Web”  written by myself and Dan Burnett, also a co-author of the main WebRTC spec and also the Media Capture and Streams specification.

Best of luck in following WebRTC!  Feel free to share your own favorite ways and links to follow this work.

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Websockets and SIP

Yesterday, RFC 6455 The Websocket Protocol was published by the IETF. This is the latest standard in the efforts to enable more applications to run in the web browser. This protocol, when supported in a browser and webserver allows the two to open additional TCP connections between them, besides the one they are using for the web session to send HTML, JavaScript, etc to the browser.

One area of application is WebRTC, the work to enable real-time communications services in web pages. One approach that has been discussed in both the IETF and W3C is to use Websockets to open a new connection between the browser and web server, and run a signaling, presence, or instant messaging protocol over it. For example, it had been proposed to run SIP, Session Initiation Protocol, this way.

A few months ago I blogged about WebRTC and SIP, and argued that SIP should not be standardized by WebRTC, as had been proposed back then. I still believe this is correct, and recent work in the IETF has centered around instead standardizing some kind of offer/answer media negotiating protocol, but leave the choice of signaling protocol open.

Recently a new Internet Draft was submitted on a Websocket transport for Session Initiation Protocol. I think this is a potentially useful approach and could be a good way to utilize SIP in conjunction with WebRTC. The draft is still in it’s early days, and has not yet been adopted by the SIPCORE Working Group yet, but I think it is a great start. SIP developers who are interested in the WebRTC effort should read this draft and support this work.

In the meantime, it is great to see WebSocket finally published as an RFC, something I hope to see happen to a few of my Internet Drafts in the new year!

 

If you are interested in WebRTC, you might like my new book “WebRTC: PIs and RTCWEB Protocols of the HTML5 Real-Time Web”

WebRTC: APIs and RTCWEB Protocols of the HTML5 Real-Time Web Book Cover

 

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