Posts Tagged blackphone

Blackphone Disconnect Secure Wireless VPN

Blackphone LogoAfter my first look, I’m back exploring the other apps on my Blackphone. See my Full Disclosure of my friendship with the Silent Circle guys and my work on the ZRTP security protocol used in the Blackphone. Today I’m trying out the interestingly named Disconnect Secure Wireless application, basically a VPN (Virtual Private Network) service.  Given that this app is all about making connections, having it called “Disconnect” is a little odd.  The name probably makes more sense with their ad and malware blocking services.  According to their FAQ: “Secure Wireless uses AES-256 to encrypt data to or from your device. Secure Wireless also enforces Diffie-Hellman for key agreement/exchange which provides perfect forward secrecy (PFS).” which is all good. Disconnect VPN Plan Out of the box, the Disconnect Secure Wireless application takes you through a short tour of the service.  Essentially, it is a VPN service that can be easily enabled/disabled and also automatically enabled/disabled based on a preference for a given network. It seems this application is only available on Android, as the iOS version seems to not be a VPN but be an add blocker of some type. Disconnect Secure Wireless starts off with a free service of 512MB per month which you would blow through very quickly if you used it for everything.  By putting the Blackphone activation code into the Account screen, you get 2GB per month, which seems reasonable if you use it sparingly, such as WiFi hotspots or when traveling.

Disconnect VPN On/Off

Disconnect Secure Wireless on Blackphone before entering the activation code to get 2GB per month.

Using it is easy – tapping the middle of the screen starts the VPN.  When turning it on, you get two warnings:

Disconnect VPN SettingDisconnect VPN Trust

 

The first reminds you that, since this is a VPN service, all the device network packets will be routed through it.  Essentially, this app is a Man-in-the-Middle (MitM), although hopefully a trusted MitM. You must tap the “I trust this application.” in order to proceed.

The next warning tells you that once turned on, the VPN will always run for this network, until you turn it off.  This is a good warning from a usage perspective.

 

Next you get a Connecting message and the middle of the screen turns green and indicates bandwidth usage for the month to date. One interesting thing – while I did notice the bandwidth usage rise with normal web browsing, I did not notice it go up during lengthy Silent Circle voice calls.  In general, for a VoIP call such as silent circle, you can use up to 1MB per minute, depending on the codec.  Perhaps the packets from Silent Circle aren’t tallied by Disconnect against the VPN quota.  Or maybe I just got lucky…

Speed Test Results through Disconnect VPN of 6.6MB/s

Speed Test Results through Disconnect VPN of 6.6MB/s

Speed Test of underlying WiFi/Cable Modem of 24MB/s

Speed Test of underlying WiFi/Cable Modem of 24MB/s

 

 

The VPN speed seemed reasonable, although a speed test during a Saturday afternoon isn’t exactly scientific.  Compared to just my WiFi over Cable Modem, it was slower, of course.  The VPN has a location configuration for North America, Europe, or Asia. I’ll need to try it other times of the day to see how well it works.

 

 

 

The default search is also provided by Disconnect, although this can be changed.  A DNS failure in the browser automatically brings up a https://search.disconnect.me search window for the failed string.    It does show the Google “G” symbol, however, indicating that it is not an actual search engine. Instead, as described here, Disconnect Search forwards you request to the engine of your choice (Google, Bing, Yahoo, DuckDuckGo, or Blekko) and anonymizes it. You can also use it in any browser at https://search.disconnect.me/ So, Disconnect Secure Wireless does what it promises to on the Blackphone.

There’s plenty more on the Blackphone. Next time, I’ll try out Smarter Wi-Fi Manager or SpiderOak or do a proper review of the Silent Circle suite…

Your suggestions, comments and questions are most welcome!

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First Look at the Blackphone

Full disclosure: I am good friends with Phil Zimmermann, co-founder of Silent Circle.  He and I worked together for many years to publish his ZRTP media security protocol as an RFC in the IETF standards body. I also helped him with his Zfone Project.  I’m also friends with Jon Callas, Travis Cross, and others at Silent Circle, who collaborated with Geeksphone to produce the Blackphone.


Blackphone Logo

 

 

After tclueconhe Blackphone was announced back in February in Barcelona, I ordered one as soon as they started taking orders, and have pretty much just been killing time ever since then.  I even had a false alarm delivery the other week when I was at the IETF conference inToronto.  Another package with an address that had “Black” in it arrived, and I jumped to the conclusion that it was my Blackphone.  Instead, my Blackphone arrived the day I was in Chicago at ClueCon, on a Security Round Table panel with Phil and Travis.

Blackphone BoxBlackphone AccsessoriesMy first impressions are quite positive: the packaging is good, the phone is nice to hold in the hand.  If anything, it feels lighter than I expected.  And it is black.  Included accessories are USB cable, charger with US and European plugs, and a headset.

Upon powering it up, you are prompted to create a pin or password, then it prompts you to encrypt the phone, which takes about 10 minutes or so.Blackphone Phone Encryption

I’ve been using Silent Circle for a while now on my iPhone, so I recognized the Silent Phone and Silent Text apps.  Silent Contacts was new to me, as were the other pre-installed security apps.

Blackphone Pre-Installed AppsIt took me a little while to get Silent Phone and Text working.  I had forgotten that I had to look up the Product Keys to get the Silent Circle Ronin code to activate the service and create my account.  The Silent Circle apps are similar to those on my iPhone although the user interface is inscrutable.  Why does it show one grey dot when I’m calling then switch to three green dots when I’m connected and ZRTP has been authenticated?  What does “Secure to server” mean?  Hopefully this is an easy fix to the UI to make it understandable.

Next, I need to try out SpiderOak and Disconnect.Me.  Also, I haven’t put a SIM in yet.  My friend James Body has given me a fantastic Truphone travel SIM that I really could have used last month during all my travels…

Look for a future post on these topics.  As always, questions & comments most welcome.

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